Animation

Discussion in 'The Media Hub' started by enviousdominous, May 23, 2016.

  1. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    When a series of images come together to tell a story to our eyes, it's as if we're watching a waking dream. Shapes and colors, that give themselves away as being painstakingly crafted after months or even years of work, make us wonder of a train of thought that the natural world just can't seem to conjure.

    Every Monday, I'm going to post a piece of animation that will preferably share three qualities. It will be short, it will be obscure and it will be enthralling. Feel free to post your own examples.

    My first post is indicative of all three categories I'm going for. It's a piece designed by animator Jake Fried, and to my knowledge he's never explained the story behind this piece. When I watch it, I imagine it as the natural rhythm of humanity come alive through art.

    Jake Fried - The Deep End:

     
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  2. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    This week, I'm submitting an animated short that's extremely significant to me in that it literally took me over twenty years to track it down. In fact; I only just found it after starting this thread.

    It's by Italian animator Guido Manuli, who apparently has a vast repertoire of animated shorts to his credit. I happened to catch this one while watching Bravo late at night back in 1995, when their programming didn't shamelessly pander to the hipster crowd, and had been searching for it ever since.

    This short film tells the story of a life created and a life prevented and all the wondrous chaos that would occur due to and in spite of that life. I find it very inspirational, and it's very easy to like the subject of this story.

    Guido Manuli - +1 -1:

     
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  3. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    This next offering might be a little too cute for some, but it's probably the most "safe for work" cartoon that I'll submit to this collection.

    This animated short was created by animation directors Jonas Dahlbeck and Pernilla Hindsefelt, both of whom mainly kept their work within their native Sweden. This example of their mastery, however obscure, managed to transcend international waters and find a small following in the US.

    Based on the hit jazz song by Duke Ellington and Ray Brown;

    Jonas Dahlbeck and Pernilla Hindsefelt - Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me:

     
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  4. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    It's been a rough week for the US, so this week's submission is something I recognize as being like chicken soup for the soul.

    There was a movie released in 2001 called "Waking Life", and it was a collection of rotoscoped scenes that would explore several different perspectives on existentialism. In itself, it's a collection of some of the most brilliant dialogue one could ever experience from a movie.

    For me; the scenes you're about to watch (from the same brief video) are the most brilliant of the entire movie. Like the rest; they're not meant to change your way of thinking, they're meant to inspire you to think. The image of a young man on a rooftop seeming to ramble, but finding inner-contentment as a result of that ritualistic rambling that -- to me -- is as if he's behaving in a polar opposite manner unto society's more common ritualistic OCDs. Just speaking, dropping your guard and being free.

    Richard Linklater - A Thousand Years is but an Instant:

     
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  5. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    For all the different styles of animation, one style -- Japanese Animation -- has captured imaginations like no other. It's a genre of animation where the expectation is that while the stories may be wildly fantastic, the occurrences that affect the characters in that story will be reflected on in a more realistic way.

    In 1986, a man named Taku Mayumura had captured the imaginations of several animation directors with his short stories. Those short stories were published as the compilation "Labyrinth Tales", or "Neo Tokyo" as it was named for English speaking countries.

    Produced in 1987 and dubbed in English in 1989, this is an anthology that will capture your soul.

    Taku Mayumura - Neo Tokyo

     
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  6. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    England has been in the news, and I've been enjoying a crash course in the British political game as a result. I understand British politics like I understand animation, I have a very superficial level of comprehension for both. Even with my admittedly meager understanding of animation, I'm able to recognize that certain countries develop very distinctive stylistic traits in their animated work.

    In 1993, a budding British animation director named Stephen Palmer was inspired by his own father's case of blindness and dementia to create an animated short called Blindscape. It was nominated for an Academy Award in 1994, though very few people have seen it as -- to my knowledge -- it's never been made commercially available to consumers. A treat for the eyes, and a warning to those who take theirs for granted.

    Stephen Palmer - Blindscape:

     
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  7. Jeff Deliverer of Mail

    Jeff Deliverer of Mail Money for nothin, chicks for free
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    Disney's The Prince of Egypt is considered to have some of the best animation ever put to film. The movie grossed 218 million and had a scene in it that took (three?) Years to animate. I'm not entirely sure on the total number of years....but the following scene is - Parting the Red Sea- ..


    [YOUTUBE]BjJi6mu_Rg0[/YOUTUBE]

    Bonus : For animation purists or anti-Disney gang members, you'll be happy to hear the film wasn't all paper drawn animation, there was computer generated help in portions of the film.
     
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  8. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    I wish everyone in the US a happy Independence Day, the most star spangled of US holidays. The nation is roughly 239 years old now, and back in 1975 it celebrated a huge milestone as it was becoming 200 years old.

    The bicentennial celebration seemed banal and uneventful to animator Vince Collins, so he decided to spruce up the festivities with an animated short called "200". I'm not totally sure if this is a genuine acknowledgement of what makes the US so awesome or if this is a mocking observation of my country's tendency toward unhinged indulgence.

    Vince Collins - 200:

     
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  9. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    I've been getting back to my Canadian roots lately, while I'm still technically a Yank as I was born in the US, I feel that the Canuck influences granted to me by my Mother allow me to feel good about appreciating Canadian contributions to the arts.

    The National Film Board of Canada has existed since 1939, and has published some of the most amazing media I've ever experienced.

    The short film I'm about to share has a special place in my heart, in that I was recovering from surgery back in 1996 and could not for the life of me fall asleep in an unfamiliar bed right after having been anesthetized for six hours. It was around midnight, and I was flipping through channels of infomercials and test signals when I came across this film. I don't know what channel it was on, but it was so damn mesmerizing that I eventually fell asleep and woke up thinking that I had dreamt this film.

    Thankfully; it's a very real film about taking pride in your existence and seeing that true beauty comes from within.

    Ishu Patel - Paradise:

     
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  10. Jeff Deliverer of Mail

    Jeff Deliverer of Mail Money for nothin, chicks for free
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    [YOUTUBE]Af5r8ONtacw[/YOUTUBE]

    AKIRA

    Akira is a future based Japanese animated film that came out in 1988. It takes place in NEO-Tokyo and the story revolves around a secret military project that turns a biker gang member into a mind controlling freak of nature that could potentially destroy the entire city.

    When I first watched it I was blown away. I hadn't seen any cartoon like it before and wasn't used to seeing any type of hyper violence in an animated film before this one. It started me on a short lived Anime' craze for the next couple of years.

    EDIT: I couldn't find a decent portion of the film to put in here so I put this song link in there instead.
     
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  11. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    The nation of France is on our minds and in our hearts. They've had many devastating occurrences within the past year and a half, but they've never lost the stigma as a nation of courage and beauty. They're a culture that, at their core, seems to understand the beauty of the human spirit.

    Serge Elissalde is a French animation director, who created his first animated film in 1990. It was called "The Street Sweeper", and it captured the essence of an identity that is so stubbornly irascible and yet vulnerable to the power of innocence.

    Serge Elissalde - The Street Sweeper:

     
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  12. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    What I'm about to share, I've posted before on the forums. I posted it to bring light to a performer who -- for all I can research -- innovated the concept of a dark brooding gimmick in the world of pro-wrestling. A British man who went by the name Kendo Nagasaki captured the imaginations of pro-wrestling fans the world over. His persona was so captivating, that in 2008 a British animation director named Rob Pointon was inspired to create a nine minute video promoting Kendo Nagasaki. The video included an amazing animated short.

    Rob Pointon - Genesis in Portrait:

     
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  13. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    One very fascinating thing about being alive, is that all life is in large part the product of carbon dust forged in the hearts of stars. The idea of being "from dust" has always fascinated me.

    Daniel Larsson and Tomas Redigh are a Swedish duo who work together in a band named "Rymdreglage". They've created many amazing stop-motion animations to go along with their songs for their YouTube channel, my favorite of which is an animation that relates to my introduction. It's a stop-motion animation that -- to me -- depicts a man born of dust, almost appearing to be reintegrated after having been disintegrated.

    Rymdreglage - Respawn:

     
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  14. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Yesterday was my birthday, and it reminds me of an animated film that really got me interested in writing. It's not a film about writing, it just had the right aesthetics to get my imagination going into overdrive.

    This animated film is called "Hunt", and it depicts a young child who I saw as very similar to myself when I had watched it on my twelfth birthday. I had received a collection of animated shorts called "Masters of Russian Animation", and this was an offering by animation director Eduard Nazarov.

    Eduard Nazarov - Hunt:

     
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  15. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Some compilations of animated work take a very long time to produce and compile. An animator named Bruce Bickford spent 20 years making short claymation films for his DVD compilation, his work totals 48 minutes of animation. His DVD, titled "CAS'L", can be purchased here, and -- for what it's worth -- I highly recommend it.

    Bruce Bickford - CAS'L:

     
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  16. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    David Lynch is a director I've been very critical of, but that's mainly because I feel that I've seen his work at its most captivating and at its most nonsensical. Sometimes he combines a mixture of brilliant and nonsensical I suppose, perhaps his meaning isn't always easy for me to grasp.

    In 1968, David Lynch produced an animated short film that recalled a moment where his wife's niece was experiencing a night terror while reciting the alphabet. We get to experience a fascinating exploration into the nightmare of a child which was thankfully captured by a great director.

    David Lynch - The Alphabet:

     
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  17. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Sometimes being haunted by imagery can be a wondrous experience. With animation, this can be done with technique as much as it can be done with content. Piotr Dumala is a Polish animation director who specializes in what is called "destructive animation", in that he creates each frame by cutting into painted plaster and painting over cuts that had already been made. This example of his work is being shared more as an example of the technique, but it's still one that'll likely give you some captivating nightmares.

    Piotr Dumala - Flying Hair

     
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  18. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    My earliest observations of humor were when I would watch episodes of Month Python's Flying Circus that had originally aired long before I was born. While watching, I'd be put into a unique state of mind while watching the bizarre animated shorts of Terry Gilliam. I wasn't completely sure if I was watching disfigured people, as he would often use images of actual people in his animation. I wasn't amused per se, more that I was fascinated and couldn't figure out why.

    In 1971, Terry Gilliam created an animated short called "The Miracle of Flight" that aired on the Marty Feldman Comedy Machine. I'm unfortunately unable to find the original broadcast, which contained animation that was cut for a 1974 theatrical release. Even without being the complete vision of Terry Gilliam's creativity, the 1974 version is still amusing without not being bizarrely fascinating in its imagery.

    Terry Gilliam - The Miracle of Flight:

     
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  19. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Fair warning; this submission might make a few viewers angry in regard to its content.

    The 1980s were a strange time, the US and Russia were competing in a propaganda war. In 1985, the Soviet Union was still very much unified as a group of nations dedicated to preserving the grandeur of Communism under a Russian head of state. All those of us within either country really knew was that our country was awesome and the other country was horrible.

    In 1985, Belorussian animator -- and founder of BelarusFilm -- Oleg Belousov created a short animated film based more on an attempt to convey the misery of life in the US than an attempt to reflect on actual occurrences within the US. Beyond the propaganda of depicting impoverished citizens of the US, this film suggests that advancements in video game realism would likely contribute to excessive violence.

    I'm sharing this as an example of how some individuals on the other side of the Cold War saw American life, and to showcase a unique animation style from a nation that isn't famous for its animated films.

    Oleg Belousov - Cowboy Games:

     
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  20. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    There's something desensitizing about prosperity, that lacking a necessity to avoid constant peril makes existence somewhat mundane as a side-effect. We can't help taking our time for granted, to a human being a seventy year life-span is full of countless examples of unique experiences that can never be truly replicated. Seconds out of the day are arbitrary, we're all looking forward to certain key events and our lives in between those events are just mindless filler.

    The following animated film is based on the idea of seeing reality though the eyes of a man who has awareness of his own doom clock. The rest of humanity is ignorant, which is best for them. His example is how I'd see my own, suddenly reacting to ever small experience and savoring those that would ordinarily just be another mundane part of the day. To no longer be wealthy with available time is about the only way I could see myself truly understanding the value of time.

    Bernardo Britto - Yearbook:

     
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  21. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    The will to live is often all it would take to exist. The probability of the average birth is roughly one in four hundred trillion, if one calculated the odds during the dawn of human existence. We are the product of a will to live on behalf of a common ancestor who endured catastrophic extinction events through history, that will to live is the subject of my next submission.

    Koji Morimoto is a Japanese animation director with credits including Akira and The Animatrix. He and seven other animators were commissioned by the A.P.P.P. production company to create animated works based only on the word "robots". The result was an anthology of some of the most amazing animated films I've ever seen, released in the US as Robot Carnival. Koji's contribution was a retelling of the story of Dr. Frankenstein called Franken's Gears.

    Koji Morimoto - Franken's Gears

     
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  22. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    My submissions are often heavy with symbolism, and this next one probably contains more symbolic references than any other that I've shared. Fair warning; it's twenty nine minutes long, so grab some pop-corn. There are subtitles by the way.

    Russia was coping with a great deal in 1979. While they had their heritage and traditions to reaffirm their grandeur on the world stage, the Cold War was Hell on their economy and they were still reeling from losing approximately eleven million young men to World War 2 as well as at least seven million civilians. One thing, among many, that they had to pick up their spirits was their love of traditional poetry and children's lullabies.

    A Tale of Tales is a movie that is a collage of various symbolic references to Russian folklore and is a visual interpretation of poetry from around the world. Yuriy Norshteyn -- who is regarded as the most famous Russian Animator of all time -- wrote Tale of Tales as a compilation of his visual interpretations of Russian culture told through poetry and lullabies, where throughout is featured the little gray wolf. The gray wolf, based on a Russian folk tale, seems to represent curiosity and wonder. In the folk tale "The Little Gray Wolf", it's the wolf who's mistakenly taken from his mother though manages to return to her. The wolf in this animated feature seems to be past the point of having a parental figure, perhaps never managing to reunite with his mother. It fascinates me because it's the idea of seeing the world through the eyes of a creature, who -- for their own individual disposition -- is nothing like the common interpretation of a wolf. He's a little careless, yes, but he represents the star-eyed wonder of someone who's discovering the beauty of the alien world around them.

    Yuriy Norshteyn - A Tale of Tales

     
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  23. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    There's a movie coming out soon that I'm sure some of you are well aware of, though I'm sharing its trailer mainly because it would be a tragedy if anyone with interest in the arts wasn't aware of it but also because it's absolutely stunning to behold.

    Vincent Van Gogh was a struggling Dutch artist during the late 1800s who had a profound talent for capturing emotion in his work. His style was unique and was truly indicative of his passion for those close to him and for the locations he adored. What's striking to me is that while he was committed to an insane asylum, his work really seemed to blossom as he had no direct visual representation for his art. His imagination could thrive under any environment, and seemed to truly blossom during times of great stress and sorrow.

    Vincent Van Gogh is considered to be the most influential artist who ever lived, and I hope this film will help endear him to future generations.

    Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman - Loving Vincent:

     
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  24. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    The following submission -- Culhwch ac Olwen -- is very dear to me, it's based on a story from the 12th century British collection called The Mabinogion. It's the story of Culhwch (Cool-a-Wik) and his quest to marry his beloved Olwen. Olwen is the daughter of a giant Ysbaddaden, and her father won't allow his daughter to be married unless he can be groomed for the wedding (though he knows that if he sees himself groomed, he will die). Watching this film as a young child, it was very eye opening to see that an antagonist's requests can be based on a noble cause.

    Unfortunately, this film is in Welsh. Fortunately, I have a copy of the English transcript. I'm uploading the film now so I don't get distracted later and forget, and I will try to find the time to type up the transcript in a subsequent post. For now, this film is breathtaking even if one can't exactly follow what's being said.

    Valeri Ugarov - Culhwch ac Olwen:

     
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  25. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Culhwch ac Olwen Transcript.

    Intro:
    This is the misty mythical land of Wales, in the Isle of Britain. A land of Kings and Heroes with magical powers. A land whose ancient language has carried many tales of daring deeds. This is but one from a collection known as "The Mabinogion". It is The Tale of the Quest for Olwen.

    00:33, scene of warthogs in the woods:
    Culhwch's beginnings were strange and mysterious. When his Mother Goleuddydd, wife of King Cilydd, was with child, she was overcome with a strange madness. While strolling through the woods, she was surrounded by a herd of wild swine. In terror, Goleuddydd gave birth to a boy. His name was Culhwch.

    01:12, scene of Culhwch riding his horse:
    Years later Goleuddydd died, and Culhwch's father King Cilydd remarried. When Culhwch was a young man, his step-mother placed a curse of love on him. Culhwch was cursed to a life in search of Olwen, the beautiful daughter of the giant Ysbaddaden, who killed all those who tried to marry her since he was doomed to die on the day of her wedding. Culhwch decided to seek the help of his cousin, King Arthur, the mightiest and most magical king in the world.

    02:00, King Arthur's round table
    Culhwch: Hail Arthur, oh great king. I am Culhwch, son of Cilydd. As your cousin, I ask for your help in seeking the hand of Olwen.

    King Arthur: You are welcome cousin Culhwch. But Olwen, who is this Olwen?

    Culhwch: I know only that she is the daughter of the king of the giants, Ysbaddaden.

    King Arthur: Ysbaddaden? I've never heard of such a king, or his daughter. What of my knights? It seems that no one here knows of Olwen, or Ysbaddaden. Well then, we are on about to help our cousin Culhwch. Kay, Bedivere.

    02:50, Culhwch rides with Kay and Bedivere
    And so Culhwch and the knights set off on their quest to find Olwen. Day and night, night and day. They traveled through many lands, faced many dangers. Through summers and winters, year after year, they traveled on. Until they reached a valley shrouded in a timeless age. There they came across an ancient herdsman.

    Culhwch: Do you know of Olwen, daughter of Ysbaddaden?

    Herdsman: Each day Olwen comes to that brook there, near my house to gather flowers and to wash her hair in the water.

    04:28, Culhwch meets Olwen
    Culhwch: Olwen? Olwen. Since the first I heard your name, I knew I could love only you.

    Olwen: It's not wise to fall in love with me good knight.

    Culhwch: But I am Culhwch, son of a king.

    Olwen: My father kills all those who want to marry me.

    Culhwch: I love you, and I would ask your father for your hand even though he may try to kill me.

    Olwen: My father will set you many impossible tasks to win my hand in marriage. Promise to do everything, or you will die a terrible death.

    Culhwch: I'd do anything for you.

    05:26, Culhwch confronts Ysbaddaden
    Culhwch: Ysbaddaden, I am Culhwch and I want to marry Olwen.

    Ysbaddaden: Let me see. So, you're the little one who wants to marry my daughter.

    Culhwch: I am a prince!

    Ysbaddaden: A Prince? You know you will have to do as I say?

    Culhwch: Yes, I am prepared.

    Ysbaddaden: *laughs* Well then I'll begin to set your tasks. When I first met Olwen's mother, nine vessels full of flax seed were sown, in that earth. But none of it grew. What you must do, is gather up that flax seed and put it in these vessels and sow it once again in the new gown. *laughs*

    Culhwch: Easy!

    Ysbaddaden: After it has grown, I want the flax to be gathered, to make a white veil for Olwen to wear at her wedding. *laughs*

    Culhwch: Easy!

    Ysbaddaden: Your Your next task will be to fetch a comb and scissors that will do the job. *laughs* Unfortunately, they will probably cost you your life, as my comb scissors and razor were taken by Wild Boar, the most ferocious best in the land. And you won't catch Wild Boar without Mabon, the finest hunter in the land. Mabon, sadly for you, disappeared without trace many years ago. Oh, and before I can shave, my beard will have to be softened with the blood of the black witch who lives in the valley of death. *laughs* Do these things and you gain Olwen's hand, fail and you die. *laughs*

    07:19, The Knights of the Round Table agree to aid Culhwch
    King Arthur: And we shall go forth, and help Culhwch perform the tasks the giant Ysbaddaden has set for him.

    One day, Gwythyr, one of King Arthur's knights, was riding when he heard strange sounds. The noises were coming from a giant anthill which was on fire.

    Ant: We thank you for saving our lives, kind knight. We are small, but we would like to repay you in any way we can.

    Gwythyr: That is kind of you, but there's nothing. If there is, could you collect from the earth seeds that have not grown?

    Ant: Yes, of course.

    (I'll have to pause here, this is way more difficult than I thought it would be.)
     
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