What's Happening in Hollywood?

Discussion in 'The WrestleZone Symposium' started by SSJPhenom, Dec 1, 2017.

  1. SSJPhenom

    SSJPhenom The Phenom of WZ

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    Idk if people even keep up with the news anymore, but if you watch any kind of media, then you've heard about the recent string of firings, suspensions, and other situations happening as a result of a slew of sexual harassment accusations and what not. Now I'm not here to argue whether or not they're true or if this actually happens in Hollywood or not. What I want to talk about is what people are actually calling sexual harassment.

    When I think of sexual harassment; I think of inappropriate touching, grabbing one's butt, maybe worse. Maybe inappropriate gestures, maybe grinding up against someone. I think of offering advancement in return for sexual favors. I think of inappropriate comments; saying someone has a nice ass, big breasts, a big dick, stuff like that. If these people being accused are doing things of that sort, IMO they deserve worse then just being fired. That kind of stuff is revolting and has no place in the workplace, however, I've read two different cases, just this morning, where a person was fired with none of that stuff. They were fired for saying stuff like someone looks great in that outfit, for giving hugs, maybe a kiss on the cheek, a pat on the back, stuff like that. Now, I for one don't consider that stuff sexual harassment. I was raised in the south and people do that kind of stuff all the time. I don't see how that stuff is sexual harassment. If it is, then maybe I've harassed people sexually. I give back pats and compliment a person when they're looking good too. I'm not a big hugger, but I have no problem with hugs.

    My point is, do people want to play the victim so bad that they literally will get offended at stuff like compliments, hugs, back pats, etc. or are those things really sexual harassment? Have we, as a society, gone a little too far with needing there to be a bad guy and a victim? A little too far with finger pointing? A little too far with excuses for stuff like why we didn't get that job or why they might not have gotten that part? Am I completely off base here?

    What are your opinions?
     
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  2. George Steele's Barber

    George Steele's Barber Advertise Here $9.95/month

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    Nothing you describe above:
    - comments about appearance
    - a pat on a back
    - a kiss on a cheek
    - a hug

    is part of anyone's job description as something they need to do or accept to do as part of their job. While they may be accepted by some it does not have to be accepted by all. You didn't post a link to the stories and I doubt the stories go in to much detail but I would hope that anyone fired for the allegations above were presented with the issues and given a chance to alter their behavior. All of the Hollywood, and news media harassment/assault stories that have lead to immediate suspensions or terminations that I have heard about have been pretty severe. What you described above isn't nearly as bad but I understand why someone may not feel comfortable. If the accused can't curb their behavior, they need to go. Employees should be comfortable at work. It is reasonable that someone may not feel comfortable with any type of touching or comments on appearance.
     
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  3. Spidey

    Spidey Should've Reinstated The Fox
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    Nah. We learned when we were ten to keep our hands to ourselves, and if a professional can't remember that then maybe their job doesn't mean that much to them. They're big boys who should know what consent is.

    It's not playing the victim. It's speaking up on bullshit that isn't and shouldn't be part of the workforce. Being from one part of the country doesn't exempt that.
     
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  4. Kodo Sawaki

    Kodo Sawaki Championship Contender

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    Depends. In most cases I heard from Hollywood(Weinstein, Spacey, Louis CK even Ratner) they deserved what happened. I mean, sure, you could argue how most of those women werent above doing what was expected from them to do to get parts in a movie, but its still wrong and punishable by law and from most of those stories I heard all those men deserve far worst then just canceling movie project even if that movie could be really good, Godamnit Louis CK you public *********or. :(

    As for where is the limit, I have a theory that we as a society have become far too selfish and fragile. Today people get triggered very easily with so trivial stuff. So no wonder we have come to position where you have to measure every word and move you do.
     
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  5. SSJPhenom

    SSJPhenom The Phenom of WZ

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    The specific person that I was referring to when I said that I read a news story that he was fired for sexual harassment accusations that didn't seem to severe was Andrew Kreisberg. He was an executive producer for the CW's Arrowverse. He was recently fired from his position and while, you're right, the reports don't go into too many details, a few individuals, including Kreisberg himself, said that all he'd do is give the usual back pat, a hug, maybe a kiss on the cheek. I can't find the initial report that I read, but he had a few people corroborate that.

    Now, if he did in fact do worse than that, then yes, he deserved his treatment and possibly worse, however, if that's all he did he should've been given a chance to change his behavior. I do agree that nobody signs up to go to work and be touched or commented on so I can see why there'd be a zero tolerance for anything of that sort, however, I just don't think those things are that bad. People do have the right to a safe and comfortable working environment though.
     
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  6. Navdeep

    Navdeep Dark Match Winner

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    You can't praise a asset , butt or figure, you are working with them, so you should be praising their work, not body.
    Ofcouse it is my personal opinion. Agree with GSB post completely
     
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  7. Jack-Hammer

    Jack-Hammer YOU WILL RESPECT MY AUTHORITAH!!!!
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    When it comes to any sort of physical contact in the workplace, outside of maybe a handshake or a pat on the shoulder, it's just best to keep your hands to yourself at all times. In this day and age, even if something inappropriate didn't happen, really all that anyone has to do is make the allegation and you're screwed so it's best to just be as hands off as possible with co-workers. It's cynical as hell not to be able to trust someone, but I'm of the opinion that's how you have to be because the world's a cutthroat place full of people who want to make sure that everyone else walks on eggshells.

    I learned in kindergarten that you should keep your hands to yourself at school, so I see no reason at all why the same shouldn't be true for the workplace. If you wanna compliment someone on how they look, resist it because you're just asking for trouble because people are no damn good. DTA buddy, don't trust anybody.
     
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  8. Navi

    Navi With the safety off!!

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    In today's climate it's better just to keep your hands to yourself. And it's not even your hands that can get you into trouble. The definition of sexual harassment is as follows.

    Harassment (typically of a woman) in a workplace, or other professional or social situation, involving the making of unwanted sexual advances or obscene remarks.

    So even making some sort of dirty joke can get you into trouble depending on the person you are saying it too. It really depends on how well you know your co-worker and what kind of person they are. Women can be just as bad as men when it comes to crap like that.

    What really bothers me is that fact that some of these accusations against the people involved go back decades. Why did these women not come forward before? Why didn't their families do something about it when it happened? Now it's become if you don't believe them and fire the person that's being accused, then you are some kind of pervert yourself.

    In the case of Judge Roy Moore, one of his accusers says she has evidence that he knew her. Something to do with the fact that he signed her yearbook, yet her lawyer Gloria Aldridge won't let the lab test the yearbook to date the ink and to verify that it is his signature. He's saying it isn't. That speaks volumes to me. If you have evidence then bring it forward.

    I guess all I know is that it isn't over yet. Almost everyday we are hearing of someone else who has been fired or is resigning from their position in politics. This is just the beginning, they are dropping like flies.
     
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  9. HBK-aholic

    HBK-aholic Shawn Michaels ❤

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    Oh for the love of God can we stop with this bullshit? Women can never fucking win here. We tell someone what happened straight away? "What were you wearing? Did you lead him on? Had you drank any alcohol? How many sexual partners have you had?" So we wait. "Why didn't you come forward sooner? Your timing is convenient. You're being paid to say this. What do you want? Clearly have something to hide." This world is fucking shit if you are a woman who has been sexually assaulted or harassed, and you wonder why we don't come forward immediately.

    And this is before getting into the psychological effects of abuse. This post is disguting.
     
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  10. George Steele's Barber

    George Steele's Barber Advertise Here $9.95/month

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    I'm more bothered by things like rape, assault, harassment, intimidation, and abuse of power but to each their own.

    Fear and/or ignorance.

    Fear and/or ignorance.

    I've never heard this before. Can you provide an example?

    She saying a lot more than they knew each other.

    .

    If an expert says the evidence is inconclusive or fake it kills every woman's story. It is not worth the risk.
     
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  11. Da Prophet

    Da Prophet Mid-Card Championship Winner

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    I only shake hands with co-workers, both in and outside of the workplace.

    People have different feelings towards certain social interactions which some find acceptable while other do not. Why risk it? Protect yourself and those around you, stick with a handshake, keeps everyone comfortable.

    I was 17 when I got my first part-time job. I've never hugged another co-worker, I've said no to hugs when offered on my last day at a previous job. Not appropriate, in my opinion. Where I worked the isolated rooms all had massive glass panels so you could see straight through. That's what you need in the workplace. People have to be very careful, men and women have to take whatever steps to secure their own safety. Nobody should be in a situation where they are uncomfortable.
     
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  12. Khalifa

    Khalifa Where it at doe?

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    Legitimate questions though. You can’t just have the solution, what was the problem? I’ve never been apart of a situation like this so I don’t know how it would make me feel if these questions were asked but if I’m saying something happened then I expect questions to be asked about before during and after.

    I’m not having a go or anything, just wondering why these questions would be bad.

    Yeah I wouldn’t know how it feels again but this is what I think. Everyone knows there is monsters out there that can snap and do some fucked your things, ruin people’s life, so when a woman comes forward and people don’t believe her, it’s not because it’s the mans fault, but because woman make shit up and now its hard to believe the boy that cried wolf. The fact that the outcome will change a life completely doesn’t help. You just can’t go oh yep you’re guilty to proven innocent.

    Like I said it’s never happened to me so I don’t know the actual process of what happens but how is the world “fucking shit if you have been assaulted or harassed”? Everyone who knows what happens will surely go out of there way to help you, sympathize with you and show empathy. Is it because everyone doesn’t automatically think it’s true? Man if I was the one being accused and it didn’t actually happen before but everyone thought I did then I would feel the exact same as the woman do, “what’s the point”.

    How could the world help put more? There is constant advertisements, talks and whatever else to talk about these things, help make woman feel less vulnerable and come out more. Unless you do want every man to take the blame automatically but yeah what are some ways that people could help if it’s so fucking shit.

    I hope this doesn’t come out as I’m sticking up for abusers because I’m not, if you’re a predator in anyway then i hate ya and I plan on stopping you one day but much like child predators, there is gotta be a reason for this so let’s get to the bottom and stop it.

    Like Prophet said though just be super safe about things. I work at a school so the last thing I’m doing is being alone with a female student. It doesn’t even have to be her that could cause trouble, it could be someone saying something to their friend like “oh mr was with so n so” then that eventually gets out of context and goes to another teacher or whatever. I’m never going to put myself in that position (obviously regarding men and not people who get abused here).
     
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  13. HBK-aholic

    HBK-aholic Shawn Michaels ❤

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    They are not legitimate questions - how does what I was wearing have anything to do with my being assaulted? The implication - literally and legally, in a court of law, let alone what others think or say privately - is that if a woman was wearing a short skirt, or had cleavage showing, that she somehow 'asked' for this to happen, that she 'wanted' it, that it wasn't really assault or harassment.

    And the amount of CONSENSUAL sexual partners I have had have literally zero to do with sexual assault or harassment. What I choose to do with other consenting adults should mean nothing in a legal case against my attacker. Yet, that question is not only used in court, but again, used to imply a woman is lying, because 'she's had sex with X amount of men before, are we supposed to believe this one was unwanted?

    'Did you lead him on?' is, again, used to victim blame. Did I accept the guy buying me a drink? Kiss him? Yes? So clearly I wanted sex, and everything I did or said afterwards - including making 'NO' very clear, didn't matter - I led him on, I made him thing sex was ok, so what happened wasn't really rape, or his fault - it was mine.

    That is the problem with those questions, and that is why so few women want to come forward and report those assaults - who's going to believe us?



    Who 'cried wolf'? In an individual case, as in, you know someone, or the police know someone who has been proven to lie several times, maybe. Women, in general, have not 'cried wolf'. If anything, the current climate is showing us how few women have actually said this happened at all, as opposed to lying.

    And I'm not dealing with 'the outcome will change a life completely' - Rape and sexual harassment 'change a life completely' - yet somehow no one seems to be thinking about that.


    There are posts in this very thread that show that no, the world does not automatically 'go out of their way to help you, sympathize with you and show emapthy'. The overwhelming majority, both in law enforcement and online, is to blame the victim, usually a woman. So, after going through a traumatic assault, then being brave enough to relive your story several times to the police, answer awful questions about your personal life, go through a grueling medical examination, people literally do not believe you, or imply you were to blame for what happened. I assure you, it's shit.

    Your automatic reponse seems to be 'women lie'. They do, but not as much as men sexually harass and assault. The very OP of this post thinks it's ok to kiss women you work with - it's not. Think about this; how many women do you know who have been assaulted, or suffered some kind of harassment? I don't know about you specifically, but every man I have asked has said they know at least a few women this has happened to. Yet, when I asked how many sexual predators they know, how many men they know who kiss people against their will, sexually assault women, make inappropriate remarks, grope or fondle them at bars etc - every man I've asked says none. The numbers do not add up.

    And no, it's not about automatically sending a man to prison on the word of a woman. We all know the justice system does not work that way. But I find it funny how now men are supposed to change their behaviour, maybe make concessions such as you say, not being alone with a female student, ensuring they don't say or do anything deemed as inappropriate in order to not be falsely accused, there's a huge male outcry. You're only doing what we've been expected to do to not get assaulted for decades, if not more.
     
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  14. Khalifa

    Khalifa Where it at doe?

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    Yep fair call. Should’ve been a bit more clear. Of course what you’re wearing doesn’t matter in terms of assault. Have you had any alcohol is a good question. I’m not sure who asks how many sexual partners you’ve had. Weird question to ask. Maybe it’s in term of have you had sex like once and this was just a different experience you’re not use to etc. Maybe same with the clothing, were you wearing some sexy and then changed your mind way half way through. Helps get a better understanding. Probably inappropriate but if someone is lying then it could help solve the case. Guy says he’s guilty, investigators asks what she was wearing, turns out to be lingerie and it was going to lead to something more but the girl changed her mind or whatever. Probably happens in 1 out of a million cases but I’d be glad if I was that one case.


     
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  15. Rainbow Yaz

    Rainbow Yaz Sing about me, I'm dying of thirst
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  16. HBK-aholic

    HBK-aholic Shawn Michaels ❤

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    Google shows several times this has been used against a woman - it's a genuine question asked. If a woman has had what society deems as too many sexual partners, the defence uses that against her. Which is ridiculous, but, again, explains why so many women don't choose to come forward. Who wants their sex life judged in a courtroom, when you're already vulnerable?

    Knowing what happened is different to using innocent actions to victim blame. Like you've agreed - those questions aren't suitable, but moreso, how they're USED is not suitable. For example - asking if someone has been drinking - acceptable to ask in order to understand the testimony, whether any details may be foggy etc. Not ok to ask in order to say she wanted sexual contact because she was drunk.


    Questions are asked. Questions are fine. Questions should be asked. But we ask the wrong questions for the wrong reasons, then wonder why no one comes forward? To be clear, I despise people who lie about this, and absolutely believe they should be in prison if found to be lying. I just don't believe it's even slightly close to the amount of genuine people coming forward, and certainly no where near as high as men want us to believe.

    It is a ridiculous question, asked only by those who haven't looked into it, or been in the situation. Honestly, a simple google explains this relatively well.

    First, women are rarely believed, and don't want to go through what I explained upthread.

    Second, many people don't actually like what sexual harassment is constituted as. In the Opening Post to this thread, SSJPhenom admits he doesn't think kissing a colleague is sexual harassment - it is, legally, and his colleague would be legally within their right to say so. But, in situations which may not be seen as 'that bad' or 'not even assault' - are people going to come forward? And, remember, the US voted for an admitted sexual predator to be POTUS, so forgive them if they don't believe they'll be taken seriously.

    Third, they just want to forget what happened. There are many accounts of victims saying they felt the reporting and court case felt just as bad as the attack. Most people don't want to relive it over and over.

    Fourth, in many cases the attacker is in a position of power. Whether it be teacher, boss, judge, parent, celebrity. Those people can very easily ensure you are not believed, that you don't get to work in your chosen field, that you will be humiliated, that everyone will hate you. They can make victims genuinely believe they are wrong, that what is happening to them is ok.

    There are more reasons, as I say, a quick google can explain them far better than I can. The issue with this question, is again, it isn't asked as a genuine question, but as a way to judge the victim, in belief that waiting means lying. When there are hundreds of psychological reasons for waiting if people cared enough to actually want to know, and not just to discredit the victim.

    Question - what proof would you believe? I ask because sexual assaults are usually done in private, with no one else in the room. No CCTV etc. Even DNA evidence, assuming there is any at the time, only shows that you had sex with a person, not that there was anything illegal. I understand why, legally, you can't just send a person to prison because someone said it happened. But in a crime so personal and private, especially one that happened in the past, what evidence do you expect women to have? Genuine question.


    To clarify, it's not a negative to protect yourself from false accusations. My point was that, literally since women were small children, we are 'taught' how to not get raped. We are 'taught' to wear 'appropriate' clothing, to not drink much alcohol, to never walk alone at night, to not be alone with strange men etc.

    I don't understand why men were totally ok with us being taught that, but when it comes to protecting yourself from false accusations, suddenly having to do that is awful? I agree you shouldn't HAVE to, but all you're doing is finally what women have been told to do for years.
     
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  17. SSJPhenom

    SSJPhenom The Phenom of WZ

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    I knew this would happen. Look, I'm not going to argue and go back forth with you. I didn't start this thread to talk about the legitimacy of women's claims of sexual harassment. I started this thread to talk about what is and is not considered sexual harassment. Now, do I think it is ok to KISS A WOMAN I WORK WITH OUT OF NOWHERE?? No I do not think it's ok, especially if I barely know the person. Now, do I consider telling someone that they look good today(not that they look hot, not that their ass looks nice, not that they have nice breast), that their outfit is nice, or that I like their hair sexual harassment? No I don't. Do I consider a hug or a pat on the back sexual harassment? No I don't. Do I consider a friendly peck on the cheek sexual harassment? No I don't. If I did, then I should go to my boss right not and tell him that I was sexually harassed Tuesday when a female coworker of mine gave me a hug for fixing her computer and kissed me on the cheek. I think I'll go right now and get her fired for that even though I know she meant nothing by it and was just over joyed that she could work on a halfway decent performing CPU for the rest of the day.

    That was the point of this thread. I feel if a woman or anyone feels they've been abused, by all means, come forward and tell someone. Having said that, I also feel that not all abuse is the same. My point was, people nowadays are too PC, selfish, and not generally good people. I'd want everyone I work with to be comfortable around me and if I'd ever done something to make them feel uncomfortable, unless it was malicious, I'd want them to tell me so that I could make sure it never happened again. If they did think it was malicious, though, then they should tell someone. I don't think a hug, back pat, or yes, even a simple friendly kiss on the cheek are malicious, though.
     
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  18. HBK-aholic

    HBK-aholic Shawn Michaels ❤

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    I couldn't care less what YOU believe constitutes harassment, nor what YOUR intent was when sexually harassing someone.

    Your intent does not matter. Just don't touch your colleagues without their consent. It's actually really simple. I've been working for 10 years now and never sexually harassed a colleague of mine.

    Based on your previous posts in the Symposium I am 100% sure you and I have very differing opinions on what constitutes harassment or assault. Luckily, I have the law on my side, whereas you have nothing but what YOU want to do to a woman/girl and why we should be okay with it because you weren't 'malicious'.


    To Navi and Khalifa - you wanted to know why women don't always come forward straight away. Here is your answer. People like SSJPhenom don't believe what happened to them is 'real' abuse/harassment. They need to stop being so PC/selfish/not good people and let men harass them if they want to :rolleyes:
     
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  19. Jack-Hammer

    Jack-Hammer YOU WILL RESPECT MY AUTHORITAH!!!!
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    You should've known better. This is an extremely hot button topic right now and I'm not jumping down your throat or anything like that, but it's hard to imagine that this would be confined to the definition of what is or isn't sexual harassment.

    I get what you're trying to say, the problem is that it's not about what someone's intention is, it's in the physical act or saying something that ultimately what counts. NOBODY can ever truly, 100% know what someone's intent is in any given situation, but we take it for granted in most situations. Last summer, a co-worker of mine asked me if I'd help him move his stuff into a new apartment and I agreed; this co-worker is openly gay and works in the front office and I was the only one who was asked so could his intentions have been to spend time with me even though I'm straight? I don't know, I never gave it any thought as I figured it had more to do with me being stronger and fitter than the other guards, thereby I'd have an easier time moving furniture. One reason why I figured it was the latter as this person's never made a pass at me, never made any sort of comments that could be construed as sexual in nature, never put his hands on me, etc.

    Sometimes, a hug is just a hug and nothing more than that. I completely get that, I understand that and it's genuinely not fair when someone's intent is misconstrued as being more than that and accusations are made; after all, being someone who compliments others, hugs as a means of greeting or goodbye or what have you doesn't go hand in hand with being a harasser or an outright predator. However, as I alluded to, it's more the act itself; Al Franken has said, in response to him groping a woman's ass back in the 2000s, that he was intoxicated and it wasn't his intention to do what he did, but he did it and what if he's lying about his intentions?

    If you try hard enough, you can make some sort of case for something out of almost anything. That's not to diminish what women have endured and continue to endure in any way, it's just how it is. As a result, as I said in my earlier post, it's best if you just keep your hands to yourself and keep your mouth shut.
     
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  20. Navi

    Navi With the safety off!!

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    I know why women don't come forward, and I have a problem with it. And because you don't know me personally, let me give you a little background here.

    First of all I am a woman who was a victim of sexual harassment when I first started working for the school board. One of the guys who was my superior took every opportunity to get me alone and make sexually related comments to what I was wearing, the perfume I had on, whatever he could do he did. He never laid a hand on me, but his comments where bad enough.

    Now I had only been there for a short time, I was just married and just found out I was pregnant. My husband just got his job with the bank and we were in the process of building our home, so I didn't need this shit in my life, and made a decision to put a stop to it.

    I tried the direct method and it didn't work. I went to my superior (another man) and he didn't want to know anything about it, so I went to the only person I knew would help me, my father. My dad was high up in the government and was very well known. This asshole I worked with had no idea we were even related, which was his downfall. My dad went straight to the Minister of Education who had a meeting with me. He then went to the Superintendent of Schools and made sure that he started an investigation in to the matter.

    They soon had proof of his actions because this time they were looking for it instead of turning their heads. Within 2 month of my meeting with the Minister, the guy was gone. Early retirement was the excuse, he was never brought up on charges or suffered any punishment except for losing a very well paying job.

    After he left, other women I worked with came forward and told me they had been putting up with him for longer than I did. I couldn't understand why none of them had done anything about him before I did. I fought the battle alone, and because of their inability to take him on he was free to do whatever he wanted. And that's one of the reasons I wanted him out of there, so he couldn't do it to anyone else.

    So before you sit there in judgement of others, yes I have walked in their shoes, I have been there and done that and am stronger for it now. Quite honestly if I had never done or said anything about the actions of someone in my case would have been 27 years ago, I wouldn't bring it up now. You have to make a decision either to do something or do nothing.
     
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  21. Rainbow Yaz

    Rainbow Yaz Sing about me, I'm dying of thirst
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    Navi, you know I like you and think you are a fine poster, so please don't take this as me trying to attack you or start some shit with you.

    FIrst off, I'm sorry you had to deal with that. No one deserves it and it is kinda shit that the guy who did it basically got away with no real punishment.

    THat said, just because it was easy for you to take a stand, doesn't mean everyone else has that strength. I'm glad you had the strength to step up and I hope you haven't had any other incidents since then. The issue is that so many people have this narrow mind set that "If I can do it, then anyone can do it." That isn't the case. A lot of women, and men as well, suffer deep seeded trauma from the incidents. So many of us tend to blame ourselves for being victims, and often we are afraid of what might happen if we come forward.

    I can't speak for anyone but myself, so I will use myself as an example. Like I said earlier, I was 9 and at a two week summer camp run through the church I was attending at the time. I only knew one other person at the camp, he was my neighbor and good friend, but he was a couple years older than me and he was much more popular than I was, because I have always been an extremely shy person. One of the counselors came up to me one day while I was sitting alone while at lunch and started to talk to me and was extremely nice. Over the next seven or eight days he would always hang out with me, took me fishing, bought me food from the snack stand(which was huge for chubby nine year old me), picked me for his team in sports. He was basically my best friend at camp. Then one day in the showers, it was just the two of us and I was sexually assaulted. I'm not going to go into detail as to what exactly happened because it is graphic, but it probably isn't too hard to guess. For the next few days after he completely ignored me and hung out with other kids. I was hurt, because I thought I did something to upset him. It took a couple of days for the reality of the situation to set in, for my mind to kind of process what actually took place, and I was scared. This guy had been my friend, I didn't want him in trouble. Through support groups and stuff, I have found that that mind set is super common among victims. This guy had been nice to me, he buttered me up and made me feel good, then he used his position of power over me to take advantage of me. That is what happens in a fair number of cases, and because our society has a tendency to victim blame, the victims in these cases are scared and feel powerless.

    I'm not going to say that what you went through wasn't bad, because it was and like I said, I'm glad you had the courage to take a stand. Most people don't though, and you can't judge them based on how they handled the situation differently than what you did.
     
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  22. Rainbow Yaz

    Rainbow Yaz Sing about me, I'm dying of thirst
    E-Fed Mod

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    You also once tried to argue for pedophilia, so of all the people in this thread who have an opinion on what constitutes sexual harassment, I have a feeling that yours isn't going to be taken as fact.
     
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  23. Uncle Sam

    Uncle Sam Rear Naked Bloke

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    Edit: To Navi,

    I feel like there's a sentence or something missing from your post because, as far as I can tell, you're acknowledging (in fact, detailing) how culture can discourage women from coming forward and how women can come forward yet be suppressed by power structures (as in what would have happened to you if you weren't fortunate to have a father high up in government), yet you're saying people shouldn't come forward years after the fact because... why, exactly? Because if they didn't feel comfortable at the time saying something, or do say something but have it suppressed... I'm having trouble completing the thought because I just don't understand how it follows.
     
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  24. HBK-aholic

    HBK-aholic Shawn Michaels ❤

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    Unless the intent of your post was to prove my point, this does not make sense.

    I'm sorry - and you said MY post was 'sitting in judgement of others'? :wtf:

    So, what you're saying is, you weren't believed, or people didn't care, when you got the courage to stand up for yourself? I'm glad you had your father in a position of power in order to stand up for you. I'd be willing to bet his other victims, who you so awfully judge (and BLAME?!) here:

    maybe didn't have the father in government in order to help them, and were afraid of the treatment you got before involving him.


    Oh the irony.

    So, as you believe so strongly that women absolutely have to speak up immediately - why were there multiple occurrences of this happening? To be clear, I disagree, but - this is your argument - why did you allow multiple sexual comments? Why did you not report the FIRST time he tried to get you alone, or make you feel uncomfortable? I understand why you may not have, but according to your own posts here, you do not.


    Women do make that decision - but so what if that decision is made years later? I made the decision to speak up 7 years after I was first assaulted. I won't bore you with my story or reasons, but according to you, I shouldn't have bothered having him imprisoned, because I waited?

    And that is why your post disgusts me.
     
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  25. SSJPhenom

    SSJPhenom The Phenom of WZ

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    If that's what you took from that thread and if, judging by her earlier post is what HBK-AHOLIC took from my comments in this thread is that I condone sexual harassment, don't think it's a big deal, think that small things don't matter, then either you two misread, misunderstood, or intentionally misconstrued my comments into something they're not. I'll go with the latter because I don't think either of you are stupid enough to misread or misunderstand. Jack-Hammer got it.

    But of course, I'm just the resident pedophile around here so everything I say should be overlooked and simplified into, "Well his outlook is awful". I was simply saying that some people accept different acts, situations, etc as harassment. I was simply saying that sometimes, things can be taken out of context or taken to mean something different then it was. I guess next to pedophilia I'm also a sexual harassing perv since I told one of my long time co-workers that I liked her hair yesterday. She'd clearly had a haircut and had been talking about it with others. So when I talked to her I told her hair looked nice. Damn, I'm the asshole. I see it now. I guess I shouldn't have told another one of my co-workers that I liked his new shoes. Am I saying that everyday I hug, kiss, and comment on every woman I see? No. As I said I'm not a big hugger, and honestly, I only really socialize with the people I've been working closely with for over 6 years now. Like I said, if I'd ever done anything to make anyone feel uncomfortable either tell me so I can make sure it doesn't happen again or report me so they make sure it doesn't happen again. I don't think I've done that since everyone I socialize with at work seem to respect me. I respect them. As I said in an earlier post, nobody signs up to go to work to be touched, commented on, etc. People should be comfortable at work so if a hug, a back Pat, or a compliment offends someone, tell someone. I'm just not above thinking that sometimes, maybe a lot of times that stuff is taken out of context and over blown into becoming something it's not. Kinda like you've done with my own comments. If someone is legitimately offended, though, they should come forward. Idc what the situation, if you don't like it then do something about it.

    Just so we're clear, though, Tuesday when I fixed my co-workers computer and she hugged me and kissed me on the cheek, I was sexually harassed and I should go to my boss and report her for it?
     
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