Animation

Discussion in 'The Media Hub' started by enviousdominous, May 23, 2016.

  1. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    09:04, Olwen admires her new veil:

    All the flax was replanted, and the flax made into a beautiful headdress for Olwen.

    Ysbaddaden: *groans* A curse on this Culhwch, and on King Arthur who's helping him! But they will never find Mabon!

    09:40, King Arthur plans to search for Mabon:

    King Arthur: And now the search for Mabon begins. Mabon disappeared so long ago that only the most ancient of the animals would know where he is.

    Gwrhyr: I speak the language of the animals. I shall talk to them, they may know something of Mabon.

    King Arthur: Kay, Bedivere, go with Culhwch and Gwrhyr to seek these ancient animals.

    10:50, Culhwch, Gwrhyr, Kay and Bedivere seek the ancient animals:

    Gwrhyr: EAGLE OF GWENABWY! EAGLE OF GWENABWY! Ancient Eagle of Gwenabwy!

    Eagle: Who calls for me?

    Gwrhyr: I am Gwrhyr, a knight of King Arthur's court!

    Eagle: What? What brings you here?

    Gwrhyr: We are searching for Mabon! Do you know where he is!?

    Eagle: Though I'm of a great age, I know not of Mabon. However, the great salmon of Llyn Llyw is even older than I. He may know of whom you seek.

    12:00, Culhwch's party searches for the ancient Salmon:

    Gwrhyr: Salmon! Salmon of Llyn Llyw!

    Salmon: Who is it who calls me?

    Gwrhyr: We are King Arthur's knights! And we are searching for Mabon!

    Salmon: Each tide I swim up along the river, until I come to the castle of Caerloyw. And each time there I hear the wails and lamentations of a prisoner. He could be the Mabon you seek. Climb on my back, and I shall take you there.

    Culhwch: The castle! There is the castle of Caerloyw!

    Mabon: HELP ME! HELP ME!

    Culhwch: Who's that!?

    Mabon: I AM MABON!

    Culhwch: We are knights of King Arthur! Will you help us capture Wile Boar!?

    Mabon: IF YOU CAN FREE ME FROM THIS PRISON I'LL HELP YOU!

    Culhwch: Fear not! We will free you!

    13:15, Ysbaddaden laments Mabon's return

    Ysbaddaden: *groans* Mabon! Mabon, They have found Mabon!

    13:30, King Arthur's knights hunt Wild Boar

    Mabon: Wild Boar!

    Mabon: There he is!

    15:50, Culhwch presents the comb and razors to Ysbaddaden:

    Culhwch: Here! Here are the instruments to dress your hair and shave your beard, for my wedding.

    Ysbaddaden: *groans* You think you've got the better of me. But you will never have the blood of the black witch.

    16:15, King Arthur hunts the black witch:

    Black Witch: Why am I honored by such a visit, gentlemen?

    King Arthur: We have come for your blood.

    Black Witch: HA! It is I who will have your blood gentlemen. But you're welcome to try. *laughs*

    King Arthur: I think this foul brew will shave even Ysbaddaden.

    17:40, Ysbaddaden prepares for Olwen's wedding:

    Ysbaddaden: Mirror. Show me myself.

    20:00, Culhwch and Olwen are married:

    King Arthur: All our exploits now are ended, love has triumphed over evil, and Culhwch has proved himself a brave defender of good. I wish you my cousin Prince Culhwch, and the beautiful Olwen, great joy and long life. And may you rule wisely over your kingdom.

    And that is how Culhwch sought and won the love of Olwen.
     
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  2. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    We're getting close to Halloween, so this week and next I'll be sharing animated films that reference short stories by Edgar Allan Poe.

    This week's film is a take on The Fall of the House of Usher, which for my imagination is one of the most terrifying stories ever written. Adding to the horrific content, this version of the story is animated by the very eccentric animation director known as John Schnall. The imagery is amazingly well detailed, and yet the animation style of this film presents a haunting presence as the details of the scenery seem to flutter maniacally.

    What I love most about this story is that I had always felt like the unnamed main character was supposed to be experienced as though he was the reader. The idea being that he's surrounded by all the makings of a classic gothic horror, and yet he makes every effort to discount the strange occurrences as the careless wandering of his overactive imagination. Basically; he's a very sane person made to endure insane circumstances. My own take is that the house itself is indicative of the potential for the Usher line, and that it represents the internal horror one faces when confronted with an end to a powerful legacy.

    John Schnall - The Fall of the House of Usher:

     
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  3. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    This next submission isn't very obscure, it's an oscar nominated short film based on one of the most popular short stories of all time. Many adaptations exist, but this one is far and away the greatest.

    In 1845 Edgar Allan Poe wrote a story that -- to me -- was meant to put the reader into the mind of someone who is insane, thus the reader becomes the ego of the main character. While the reader may see through the main character's rationalization as the ravings of an insane man, such a mind has lost all connection with the ego which must silently wait for the inevitable.

    In 1953, UPA Producer Steve Bosustow wanted to capture the power of Poe's imagination by producing a short based on The Raven. Animator Paul Julian recommended that the film be based on The Tell-Tale Heart instead, in that the main character is confused more by desperation than by sorrow. When this film premiered in 3D in 1953, children were terrified to tears and an adult fainted upon witnessing the main character commit murder. James Mason's spot on narration likely played a huge role in the suspense.

    Ted Parmelee - The Tell-Tale Heart:

     
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  4. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Something a little more recent this week, but still more obscure than it should be. This film was produced all the way back in 2012, and it's apparently based on the struggle of a perfectionist to capture beauty through art. In a failed attempt to capture his vision, the protagonist finds himself trapped within the Salvador Dali-esque limbo of his own mind.

    It's appropriately titled "The Unfinished Painting", and it was designed by a budding Bulgarian animation director named Rositsa Vangelova. For more of her art, one can reference her Deviant Art page here.

    Rositsa Vangelova - The Unfinished Painting

     
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  5. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Osamu Tezuka was an animation director whom any respectable fan of anime is aware of. He's considered to have been the Godfather of anime for good reason, distinctive traits of anime -- large eyes for good characters, small eyes for sinister characters for example -- were invented by Osamu Tezuka. He had a love of animation that showcased his unique perspective of the world around him, this week's offering is what I believe to be his most prominent example of his imagination run wild.

    This film is called "jumping" and it's an amazing example of imagination come to life, long before the use of computer generated animation enhancements. It depicts a young child jumping, trying with each jump to witness more of his world. If you have a keen eye, you'll notice brief moments where characters from various western films make cameo appearances. While some animated films are difficult to relate to, this one captures your perspective and makes your nerves react as though you are the protagonist.

    Osamu Tezuka - Jumping

     
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  6. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    When it comes to grotesque imagery, there's a fine line between that which is repulsive and that which is fascinating. Igor Kovalyov is one of those rare artists who can compel you to never look away while displaying images of life forms that are overly detailed to present the types of physical imperfections that our fantasies often ignore. He's also a master of presenting more blatant forms of the nuances that silently haunt most of us, ideas of wonder, fear and doubt that are indicative of fiction by Edgar Allan Poe.

    Igor Kovalyov is most famous as the animation director for The Rugrats Movie, and his short film titled "Hen His Wife" is also a beloved classic. However; my favorite of his creations (mostly due to its obscurity) is a short film that attempts to artfully portray a day in the life of a Russian peasant. Everything about this film haunts my senses; the way the scenery flutters with different hues of gray, the body language of animated characters making them come alive in my imagination and something as simple as the grass at 14:16 growing back into place.

    Igor Kovalyov - Andrei Svislotskiy

     
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  7. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    My favorite animated films are painstakingly perfected examples of an artist's passion for art, few animators take the time to personally correct every perceived imperfection in their work. Caroline Leaf is considered to be a very obsessive artist, and her short film "Two Sisters" is a powerful example of her dedication.

    Two Sisters was created through a technique involving etching images directly into unused film, all colors seen are residue from film that wasn't abrased. It's a story about two young women who live together, somewhat codependent on the need of one sister to be unseen from the eyes of the public. It's a two year labor of love on part of one of the greatest animators of all time.

    Caroline Leaf - Two Sisters

     
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  8. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    I tend to dabble in something known as "Dadaism". My best explanation for the concept is that it's a means of challenging common perceptions, this can at times be manifested as someone pretending to be a proponent of common perceptions while faking a mental state of aloofness where they overlook exploited flaws in such designs.

    I don't consider myself to be a full-fledged Dadaist, but I think that I have a keen ability to recognize it even when it's presented in a manner that's too subtle for most people to be able to recognize it.

    Takashi Taniguchi was a prolific voice actor prior to his death in 2012. His body of work included Japanese voice over dubbing for the variations of the Biff Tannen character in the Back to the Future films, the character of Sarge in Toy Story 1 and 2, Lee from Enter the Dragon and Walker from Walker Texas Ranger. His style of animation is strange, to put it lightly.

    I suspect that Takashi Taniguchi used animation to lampoon Japanese societal norms in a way that appeared to be a failed attempt at celebrating those norms. Famous Dadaists like Andy Kaufman never gave direct indications of their true motivations, and there is almost nothing online to suggest what Takashi Taniguchi's vision was for his art.

    Takashi Taniguchi - Great Detective Gordon

     
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  9. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Going way back this week, all the way back to 1921 when an American animation pioneer named Winsor McCay brought to life one of his many stories from his comic series known as "Dream of the Rarebit Fiend".

    Winsor McCay considered animation to be a sacred art, and he loathed the idea that it would ever become the mass produced example of quantity over quality that it's become today. He would painstakingly reinforce his beliefs by personally drawing each frame by hand for his work, and his films stand as timeless examples of animation mastery.

    The Flying House is a fun film about a man who takes matters into his own hands when confronted with the dire consequences of debt. It goes beyond the simplicity of the plot and explores the far reaches of Winsor McCay's overactive imagination.

    Winsor McCay - The Flying House

     
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  10. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Back in 1981, a film called American Pop was released that was almost entirely an example of rotoscoped animation. It was the many stories of a group of American's connected by blood who all experience American culture in ways that were mandated by the eras they lived in. The animation was directed by Ralph Bakshi, whom I have very little respect for as a person due to the exploitive nature of his more popular work, but this film served as a very appropriately portrayed lens on American life.

    This is a scene from the movie that stays with you long after you've watched it, it's beautifully tragic and intensely thought inspiring.

    Ralph Bakshi - American Pop

     
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  11. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    The spirit of Christmas lingers, and nearly every show on tv has found a way to showcase how their cast celebrates the occasion. I'm a fan of minimalist art in whatever form it's depicted, and one of the most prominent examples of minimalism in art is the Tom Wilson comic strip Ziggy. Ziggy is an adorable character who acknowledges every potentially detrimental aspect of his being, and still -- not as a coping mechanism -- appreciates the good things in his world.

    Ziggy was animated as part of a one-off Christmas special called "Ziggy's Gift". In preparation for a day which would bring misery onto some with Ziggy's circumstances, he sets off to make the day as potentially joyous as he can. The principles exemplified in this short film have influenced me for almost three decades of my life, and the theme being performed by one of my favorite songwriters named Harry Nilsson only adds to my adoration.

    Richard Williams - Ziggy's Gift

     
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  12. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    The meaning of life is relative to the observer, though some aspects remain constant. We prioritize our needs in this world and at times fate will test our dedication to what idea we value more than any other, meaning is granted only on the basis that our fleeting whims demand as much.

    We struggle to live knowing that one day we'll die, and we struggle to preserve things even though nothing is forever. Sentience permits us to find harmony between a desire to change and the understanding that such efforts ultimately mean nothing.

    A profoundly meaningful movie from my youth was Charlotte's Web, and recently we lost the voice actor of Charlotte, Debbie Reynolds. Almost thirty years later I'm stricken with the same grief that I felt upon discovering within myself the ability to care greatly for life, in all living things. I'm sharing a scene from Charlotte's Web that will likely live with me for as long as I'm alive.

    Iwao Takamoto/Charles August Nichols - Charlotte's Farewell

     
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  13. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Few have the ability to capture the images that haunt their imaginations, or even conceptualize their thoughts through imagery. Rene Laloux, the most famous of all French animators, used animation as a means of expressing his imagination. While he would always apply a plot to his work, his efforts were more to satisfy his ambition. Rene Laloux directed three animated feature films; Fantastic Planet, The Masters of Time and (one of my favorite films of all time) Light Years.

    The film I'm going to share is what I believe is the first film that Rene Laloux ever created, which was compiled from art created by residents of the mental asylum where Rene Laloux was working. The film "Monkey's Teeth" is -- to me -- a depiction of the apathy felt on part of physicians in regard to the plight of the mentally ill. In this film, a dentist exploits his patients' gullibility by stealing their teeth so they can be sold to the wealthy. The teeth that are taken are shown to be, unto the patient, an extension of their love for family. A traveling monkey, being the type of species that ordinarily endures heartless medical exploitation, is the hero of this film.

    Rene Laloux - Monkee's Teeth

     
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  14. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    I've taken a few weeks off, and for those who may be curious, I present my best explanation:

    I have an exam deadline of March 6th, and two more exam deadlines by May. Originally I had until July to complete the other two exams, but the date was moved back because my employer decided that I was going to go on a trip in May.

    I'm posting again because there's an example of animation that is a perfect storm of captivating symbolism and coincidental beauty. It's a short film by world renowned Swiss animator Georges Schwizgebel, and it is an example of when an incredibly brilliant animator manages to outdo themselves.

    Georges Schwizgebel found inspiration in the Tang Dynasty philosopher Liu Zong Yuan, who would often ponder the notion of how a civilized existence can make one forget themselves. The idea of the deer in Liu Zong Yuan's philosophies was that if one found a way to not startle a deer, they would essentially doom that deer to a tragic end.

    This film originally featured a musical score by Philippe Koller, though I've found a version that features music by the Scottish band known for the haunting ambience of their work known as Boards of Canada. It is remarkable how well these two unrelated art pieces marry up to one another.

    Georges Schwizgebel - The Year of the Deer

     
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  15. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    The greater good is an often used means of marginalizing the costs of war. However one may feel about the subject, there are voices from behind battle lines that betray the notion that they are the enemy. We can choose not to listen, though that doesn't diminish the power of their message.

    This submission is a biography of a very brave girl who endured the bombing of Hiroshima, her name was Sadako Sasaki.

    Leonie Connellan - Sadako's Story

     
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  16. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    We all have our opinions on the significance of February being Black History Month, either way it seems like an appropriate time to post an animated video featuring one of the most brilliant human beings who ever lived.

    Maya Angelou reportedly did not speak until she was eight years old, the reason for which is one of many very intense experiences that she had to endure throughout her life. In her life, she was the rarest gem among a populace that was, at best, not nearly as refined as her. I absolutely love this woman with all my heart, and I heed her lessons every day throughout the year.

    The following is an interview conducted by Studs Terkel in 1970, presented in animated form by the PBS series known as "Blank on Blank". All of their episodes are available on YouTube, and every one of them are amazing examples of the character behind some larger than life figures. Also; this particular interview makes reference to the origins of the term "mark", which I think bears significance on a pro-wrestling forum.

    Patrick Smith - Maya Angelou on Con Men

     
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  17. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Dreams are many things to many people, they're an anomaly of our subconscious mind that can reveal truths of ourselves that we've never considered. One can't help but wonder if a dream is more than just our mind placing our perspectives into irrationally arranged imitations of reality, if perhaps we're being given directions from a higher power or if we're being presented with a mild impression of things to come. However we interpret our dreams, when we dream we're often trapped in that world of our mind's creation while being convinced that every odd occurrence is (at the very least) real.

    Before any major production really attacked the idea of dreams being more than they seem, British animator Tony Collingwood produced his first work known as Rarg. This film found so much success around the world, that Tony Collingwood was able to start his own production company -- Collingwood & Co. -- that still exists today.

    Tony Collingwood - Rarg

     
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  18. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    We have the ability to assign meaning, through our wild imaginations we can grant significance to anything. Your current state of mind, environment and potential are all subject to the whims of how you interpret them. What's real can be scientifically proven, but what's believed can shape what's real from an obscure set of mundane facts into a beautiful tapestry of blissful truths.

    The Old Man and the Sea was a story published by literary great Earnest Hemingway in 1952, and it was as much an allegorical lesson on the wonders of existentialism as it was just a simple story about a determined old man. You read the book, and the book speaks to you, as if a God-like observer is reporting to you as though you're an even higher power. The story involves the old man, who watches the fish of the sea as a God in his own right and wonders out loud how far his love for them can reach. The old man is determined to catch one particular fish, and his effort to do so shows that his struggle is more for purpose than survival.

    Russian animator Alexander Petrov won the Oscar in the category of "Animated Best Short Film" in 2000 for his animated interpretation of Mr. Hemingway's masterpiece, and I believe that it was well earned. Alexander's film was created with frames that were hand painted on glass, the result being a film that's as if one is watching a painting come to life.

    Alexander Petrov - The Old Man and the Sea

     
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  19. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Very shortly after we're born, our minds go into a frenzy. Neurons develop exponentially, and our perspective becomes a star of observation. We're made of carbon forged from stars, and we become stars in our own right. Unaware of our own diminutive stature, or the invisible walls society intends to impose on our will, we discover a world of wonder that, for the fleeting moment that is childhood, fuels our voracious imaginations.

    John Hubley is a highly respected name in the world of animation. He's given us the misadventures of Mr. Magoo, and he very boldly refused to name names while being forced to testify on behalf of Joe McCarthy. His bravery caused United Productions of America to fire and blacklist him, and he promptly founded Storyboard Studios. Free to express his imagination through animation without boundaries, he (and his future wife, Faith Elliot) developed his first independent work based on the idea of a child's perspective of the world being the most significant part of an existence.

    John Hubley - The Adventures of *

     
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  20. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    One influence can affect an entire artistic medium. One American animator, named Wes Archer, is responsible for some of my favorite cartoons. He worked with Matt Groening on the first series of animated shorts that would eventually become The Simpsons, being the one who recommended using a smaller palette of colors and thus gave Matt Groening's work its distinctive colorful vibrancy. He was an on-again-off-again director for episodes of King of The Hill, and was instrumental in guiding the episodic direction of the show. He's currently a supervising director for one of my favorite cartoons of all time, Rick and Morty.

    In 1983, Wes Archer was a student at the California Institute of the Arts. Inspired by a comic strip featured in Robert Crumb's Weirdo comics, he created a cartoon that would serve as the benchmark for future cartoons based around the idea of comical mayhem. This cartoon was called "Jac Mac and Rad Boy, Go!", and it was every bit as frantic and nonsensical as the title implies. Originally aired on Night Flight in 1985, this cartoon featured the first and last appearance of the original chaotic comedic duo.

    Wes Archer - Jac Mac and Rad Boy, Go!

     
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  21. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Through the eyes of a child, the visual world is landscape of distractions. What's seen is filtered through our minds, and what remains in our memory is what we were capable of making of our experience. Our memory is a link to ourselves, a window that reminds us of ourselves as we once were. This submission is a tragic example of an individual's perspective through memory, in that it's the only way they can perceive their place in the visual world.

    Vladislav Fesenko - I Go Seek

     
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  22. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Mark Twain once said "Never let facts get in the way of a good story". Stories endear themselves to us by providing all the emotional nuance that we'd otherwise have to figure out how to responsibly apply on our own. There are times when facts overshadow the magic of fiction, and at those times all one has to do is reveal the facts in an amusing tone to tell a purely factual story.

    This submission has commentary from comedian John Morrison (not the wrestler), made even more amusing by the claymation mastery of American animator Barry Bruce. It's an examination of the darker side of public consciousness regarding the cultural identity of being an American, made amusing by tone and presentation.

    Barry Bruce - The Great Cognito

     
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  23. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    When I was a teenager, I dealt with the usual challenges of having to deal with an ever evolving world and the expectations of a society that were becoming obsolete. Eventually I asked myself "What is a perfect life?" and "What is a perfect person?" Regarding both questions; my answer to myself was, and still is, "Perfection is whatever I make of it."

    In 1935, a German animator named Lotte Reiniger used her own invention designed to take pictures for stop-motion animation to create one of her many breathtaking works. That short film is called "Galathea", and it's based off of the Greek myth regarding a sculptor named Pygmalion and a statue he created named Galathea that Aphrodite blessed with life.

    The moral of the story (it should be mentioned that the story has evolved over time) is that Pygmalion wanted to share his life with his vision of living perfection, though Galathea resented Pygmalion as he was attracted to her for her appearance. It was only after he recognized that Galathea wasn't just a beautiful woman but was an identity that deserved to be respected, that she was willing to share his life with hers.

    Lotte Reiniger - Galathea

     
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  24. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    Freedom is a relative term, we'll never be as free as the potential of its meaning to our imaginations. It seems as though we're taught a paradoxical disposition as we adapt to our surroundings, that freedom can only be achieved by applying your potential to empower a lawful society. Mother nature crafted our physiology to allow us to achieve great feats in athleticism, though we're hopelessly dependent on the resources and physics of the tiny blue dot that is planet Earth to develop properly.

    For some of us; life on Earth is another day in a human zoo. We can find pleasure in seeing ourselves achieve great things, and in wanting to match another person's level of achievement. Either way; we've learned to validate our own existence based more-so on the potential we have to serve society, and less-so on the potential we have to sustain ourselves purely on what resources the Earth provides.

    At a certain point, life becomes like what is depicted in the following submission. Every day is exactly the same, every living person serves a purpose unto society. Being as content as cattle, we accept our fate and hardly question the Oligarchs.

    Santiago Grasso - The Employment

     
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  25. enviousdominous

    enviousdominous Behold my diction

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    This will likely be my last posting for a while, as I'm about to head off on a work related adventure in an area of the world where any internet access is supposedly a rare luxury. Top men are working around the clock to make sure that there will be internet there eventually, so my fingers are crossed that I won't have to be dead to the world wide web.

    If the tales are true and I'll be taking a long hiatus from being able to blissfully procrastinate on the internet, I'd like to go out on a fun note. The Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion has been running a series of TV ads that those of us below the border haven't been able to enjoy, where they emphasize their message by adding "as fuck" at the end. It ads humor to a serious message about living life more happily, and these ads prove that Canadian wit is a criminally underappreciated aspect of life in today's world.

    Anik Rosenblum - Free AF

     
    #50
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2018

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